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dontskip9:

captainarlert:

therealbarbielifts:

bergerwithcheese:

trumpetnista:

2ndratehandjob:

lady-dirtbag:

marchqueen:

tastefullyoffensive:

Portals to Hell by hrmphfft

IT’S BACK

I HAVE BEEN TRYING TO FIND THIS AGAIN FOR MONTHS

I AM SO HAPPY RIGHT NOW

ITS BACK 

This is one of those posts that you need to save and tag or you’ll never see it again for 84 years.

Whoever drew this is an amazing person and I love them.

What in hell

Lots of thing in hell. That’s why Satan’s so irritated. Honestly, pay attention.

thetindog:

theladthatlived:

georgesus:

"He’s a little fighter. He kind of, he wriggles around quite a lot.” - Prince William

its like when you take dogs out of water and they carry on swimming

MOTHER, UNHAND ME, I HAVE A COUNTRY TO GOVERN

lwyllastorch:

tsundeanre:

thealycorn:

revstrychninetwitch:

ineffable-hufflepuff:

booksandwildthings:

backdoorteenmom:

regiinamills:

xxmickeydxx:

This is how many children that died in their Hunger Games, without even being mentioned throughout the three books. All these children were under 18. All these children had parents. All these parents’ hearts sank to their knees during their child’s reaping. All these parents saw their terrified child off at the train station. All these parents heard the sound that signified their child’s death. All these parents received their cold, dead child in a wooden box. All these parents’ lives ended there. All these parents could say or do nothing. All these parents were merely thanked that they gave up their child. Thanked.

And the media focuses on the love triangle.

All these children and all these parents aren’t real

Yeah, sure, I guess that’s true. None of these people were real.
But let’s focus on what this series, and this fact, say about our society.
In the series, the Capitol’s media focuses entirely on the ‘fun’ of the Games- the fashion, the plot twists, the favorites, the strategies, the romance. And the entire time, they completely overlook the fact that 1,678 children between the ages of 12 and 18 have died. Usually brutally murdered by other 12 to 18 year old children.
And how does our real-life media react to this story when news of a movie adaptation reaches them? They talk about the romance. This tragic story of a girl who must choose between her long-time best friend and her new love. Even if she chooses Peeta, they still must fight to the death. The star-crossed lovers of District 12. And many readers of the original novels saw the books through the same lens. You would tell them that you read/ were reading the books and their first reaction was, “Are you Team Gale or Team Peeta?”
Meanwhile, children are fighting to the death.
The fact that our media, and many every-day people reacted to the Hunger Games the same as the Capitol media scares me.
I don’t want this world to be anything like the Capitol. I don’t think any of us do.
And the fact that most of us (including myself) never really considered how many children had died in the games also scares me. But, hey, it didn’t happen now/ in the current story, so it doesn’t matter, right?

I’m not sure about that math though. I think it’s MORE.
Let’s talk about just the first 73 games, ok? Every year before Katniss and Peta. 
24 Tributes (1 girl + 1 boy x 12 districts)= 1 Victor + 23 Dead Every year
23 x 73 = 1,697
EXCEPT, the 50th games (The games Haymitch competed in) had DOUBLE the number of tributes. An extra 24 kids died that year.
1,703. 
Now, 22 kids died in Katniss and Peeta’s first game, because they both live.
1,725. 
In 74 years, the brutal, violent murders of 1,725 children aired on TV in Panem, and in both the Capitol, and on the red carpet in our world, the first question people want to ask it “Team Peeta?” Damn.

i’m not even in this fandom, but damn, that’s scary

And here we have people who GET the hunger games.

#until this moment#i didn’t realize there were still people who haven’t figured out that our reactions to media are an important indicator of our values#it doesn’t matter that they aren’t real#our reaction on a story primarily about children killing each other#was to focus on the romance#it wasn’t a romance#it’s a story about a tyrannical governemt sentencing children to death as a means of intimidating the sectors into submission#and we reacted to the games exactly the same way the capitol did

you can be as meta as you can but you can never be this meta

lwyllastorch:

tsundeanre:

thealycorn:

revstrychninetwitch:

ineffable-hufflepuff:

booksandwildthings:

backdoorteenmom:

regiinamills:

xxmickeydxx:

This is how many children that died in their Hunger Games, without even being mentioned throughout the three books. All these children were under 18. All these children had parents. All these parents’ hearts sank to their knees during their child’s reaping. All these parents saw their terrified child off at the train station. All these parents heard the sound that signified their child’s death. All these parents received their cold, dead child in a wooden box. All these parents’ lives ended there. All these parents could say or do nothing. All these parents were merely thanked that they gave up their child. Thanked.

And the media focuses on the love triangle.

All these children and all these parents aren’t real

Yeah, sure, I guess that’s true. None of these people were real.

But let’s focus on what this series, and this fact, say about our society.

In the series, the Capitol’s media focuses entirely on the ‘fun’ of the Games- the fashion, the plot twists, the favorites, the strategies, the romance. And the entire time, they completely overlook the fact that 1,678 children between the ages of 12 and 18 have died. Usually brutally murdered by other 12 to 18 year old children.

And how does our real-life media react to this story when news of a movie adaptation reaches them? They talk about the romance. This tragic story of a girl who must choose between her long-time best friend and her new love. Even if she chooses Peeta, they still must fight to the death. The star-crossed lovers of District 12. And many readers of the original novels saw the books through the same lens. You would tell them that you read/ were reading the books and their first reaction was, “Are you Team Gale or Team Peeta?”

Meanwhile, children are fighting to the death.

The fact that our media, and many every-day people reacted to the Hunger Games the same as the Capitol media scares me.

I don’t want this world to be anything like the Capitol. I don’t think any of us do.

And the fact that most of us (including myself) never really considered how many children had died in the games also scares me. But, hey, it didn’t happen now/ in the current story, so it doesn’t matter, right?

I’m not sure about that math though. I think it’s MORE.

Let’s talk about just the first 73 games, ok? Every year before Katniss and Peta. 

24 Tributes (1 girl + 1 boy x 12 districts)= 1 Victor + 23 Dead Every year

23 x 73 = 1,697

EXCEPT, the 50th games (The games Haymitch competed in) had DOUBLE the number of tributes. An extra 24 kids died that year.

1,703. 

Now, 22 kids died in Katniss and Peeta’s first game, because they both live.

1,725. 

In 74 years, the brutal, violent murders of 1,725 children aired on TV in Panem, and in both the Capitol, and on the red carpet in our world, the first question people want to ask it “Team Peeta?” Damn.

i’m not even in this fandom, but damn, that’s scary

And here we have people who GET the hunger games.

you can be as meta as you can but you can never be this meta

golden-cages:

Okay, so I thought it was about time to gather some of the most believed myths and rumours about historical people that are simply not true. Here we go:

Marie Antoinette never said “Let them eat cake!”. The phrase was first published in the memoirs of Jean-Jacques Rousseau which was written in 1765 when Marie Antoinette was 10 years old and still in Vienna.

Anne Boleyn did not have a sixth finger. After her execution it became widespread to further “shame” the late Queen and at the time a sixth finger was considered a sign of witchcraft which was just among the charges laid to her. It has been suggested that she had an extra fingernail but a King would never have married her with such an obvious mutation.

Cleopatra did not have a vibrator run by trapped bees. Like Anne Boleyn this was a rumour spread to demean the Egyptian Pharaoh and underline the rumours that she was promiscuous - which she was not either.

Lucrezia and Cesare Borgia did not have an incestuous affair. At the time incest was not merely considered wrong but a death sin and the rumour happened to circle when the Borgias was at the height of their power - it was nothing else but a way to demean and spread a sense of sin and disgust of the family.

Christopher Columbus was not the first European to discover America. The Vikings had reached American soil 500 years before Columbus ever set sails and were therefore the first Europeans to reach the new continent - of course the native Americans were already there. Leif Eriksson is the man remembered for several Viking expeditions to America and not that long ago Viking jewels and tools were found in the USA, conclusively proving that Columbus was not the man who discovered America.

Napoleon Bonaparte was not a short man. Actually, he was the average height of a French man of his time which - granted - is not considered tall today but nothing out of the ordinary. He was nicknamed “the little Corporal” not because of his height, but because he never snubbed his soldiers and was generally friendly with them.

Elizabeth I never had a child in secret. Honestly this one is just against common logic since the Queen was constantly surrounded by her courtiers and it was not uncommon for a lady-in-waiting to sleep within her chambers. This means that there is no way that the Queen could ever had had a child without anyone finding out.

Juan Borgiawas not murdered by his brother, Cesare Borgia. Though it has long been the told story the myth is today denounced as false - instead it was almost certainly the Orsini family who was responsible for the death of Juan.

Nero did not play the fiddle while watching Rome burn. There is a very simple reason for this: the fiddle was not invented until 1500 years later. Officially he was not even in Rome at the time but with an insane Emperor there is a chance he might have been there.

Thomas Edison did not invent the light bulb. The British Sir Humphrey Davy had invented a method to create light using a carbon filament four decades earlier. The only thing the technicians of Thomas Edison did was to figure out a way to make it shine for a longer period of time but they did not invent it - Thomas Edison himself was no where near the entire product.

So there you go. For some reason these rumours has survived the edge of time despite their falseness. Perhaps we just want to believe something sensational about people we can never meet?

But what made the [How I Met Your Mother] pilot pop, what made it seem smart and nuanced and surprisingly philosophical, was the closing moment when a “cute guy meets cute girl” story concluded with the narrator, the man telling the story of How He Met Your Mother, saying that this cute girl was not the mother. This was how he met “Aunt Robin.” He’d get to the mother later.

This was a move legitimately subversive of a rule that television knows all too well: The answer to “will they or won’t they?” is always “they will,” and that’s why we’re all here. Knowing that Ted did not wind up with Robin, but wound up with someone else — but still remained close enough to Robin that his kids addressed her as “Aunt Robin” — said something different. It said, “You know what? They won’t. But don’t leave yet.” It said that there is value in stories about things that don’t work out, and value in romances that end. Everyone matters, everything is important, everything fits together and makes a whole life.

The series finale revealed that to the degree this is what the show seemed to be saying, the joke was on you. It was a nine-year-long con (as James Poniewozik put it) that fooled you into thinking it wasn’t running on an engine of total cliche when — psych! — it totally was. Because it turned out that of course Ted wasn’t really saying everything matters, that your whole life is important, that you can still love people even if you don’t end up with them, that the good pieces and the bad pieces and the ups and the downs were all part of the story of how you wound up in the right place.

No, he was telling this whole story because he was in denial, and he spoke about the sad and happy moments of his life for nine seasons so that his teenage children could tell him to get over their dead mother and go after their aunt. (As the teenage children of widowed parents always do in this blithe, go-get-‘em-tiger kind of way, in Bizarro World.)

And so he did. He went and gave himself to Robin, whom he’d loved all along. She doesn’t matter because they’d loved each other and that always means something; she matters because he’s still in love with her and now they can kiss. She never wanted kids, but apparently she now wants to be a stepparent to Ted’s kids, something something mumble mumble what was this character about again?

So it was all a trick — they will after all! The end.

That’s not to even mention the other things that went wrong in the finale: The marriage of Robin and Barney, which the show spent its entire final season on, was dismissed with a sort of hand-wave of “she traveled a lot and it didn’t work out” so that Robin would be free for Ted’s destiny to be fulfilled later. The embrace of Barney as a selfish jerk seemed to be the part of its original DNA to which the show would remain true, but then — psych! — he had a baby with a woman he barely knew and we never saw, and it made him nice and domesticated. Neil Patrick Harris played the heck out of the scene where Barney falls in love with the baby, but it still didn’t make any kind of sense, nor did it resonate with anything else that had happened in the show up to that point.

Perhaps worst of all, the fine work of Cristin Milioti as the mother across the final season was wasted as it turned out she was, within the show’s structure, merely a piece of the great love story of Ted and Robin, and died of Unspecified Sad Hospital-Bed-itis so that their romantic balcony scene could happen.

"It’s the journey and not the destination" is usually the right way to look at series finales, a disturbing number of which don’t stick the landing. The problem with this one in particular is that the relationship between the journey and the destination was the show’s animating principle. That Ted was on a journey that was not about Robin was the first interesting thing the show ever said.

i’m guessing zayn really likes liam’s arms and it makes me so done with him

r5-news:

R5 at the Bing Lounge (x)

sing-dance-eat:

I love how different each of their facial expressions are

sing-dance-eat:

I love how different each of their facial expressions are